Translations into and from Basque

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The Basque language or, as the Basque people say, “Euskara,” is the only isolated language in Europe and is spoken in the Basque Country on the border between Spain and France by less than one million people. The majority of Basque speakers live in the Hispanic community Autónoma Vasca in the center of the Basque Country. A few others live in Navarre and in the three departments of French Pyrenees Labourd, Basse Navarre, and Soule.

Basque – one language, many dialects

The Basque language is comprised of ten total dialects. Those on the Spanish side are Salazarese, Gipuzkoan, Biscayan, Upper Navarrese, and Roncalese. On the French side, there are Zuberoan, Cizain, Mixain, Lapurdian, and Eastern and Western Lower Navarrese. The governmental status of Basque is not uniform on the federal or district levels. In some regions, the language has official status, but not in others.

Basque society today considers its main task to be reviving traditions and "recovering" the Basque language so as to promote bilingualism rather than displacement by French and Spanish. For this reason, there are now schools with bilingual models.

The foreigner among the European languages

Compared to other European languages, Basque comes across as rather unique. For this reason, the interest received quite early in the field of linguistics is not surprising. Even though Basque was subject to Roman curiosities during the time of the Roman empire, the origin of this language remains unknown. What’s peculiar about the Basque language is the preservation of such a unique morphology and vocabulary.

Some English and Romance words have made their way into Basque through technical terminology. Conversely, only a few Basque words can be found in other languages.

You need the right translators to master the particularly unique characteristics of the Basque language

The Basque language is characterized by a highly agglutinative word structure, which can be found in Hungarian or Turkish, for example. There is also no grammatical gendering. The most difficult aspect of Basque grammar is the lack of abstract nouns.

Modern linguistics remain unable to explain a number of peculiarities of the Basque language. For example, the language has a word for every specific type of tree found in the Basque Country but no term for the word, “tree.” Therefore, Basque is rather unusual for speakers of other European languages.

Our native-speaking translators are familiar with Basque’s linguistic idiosyncrasies and can translate your text quickly and accurately.

Do you have relatives or business partners in the Basque country and need translations into or from Basque? Then, you’ve found the right partner! Simply send us the text to be translated via email, and you will receive a no-obligation quote promptly.

2017-07-11T07:58:06.9909664Z

Erwin Vroom
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